Tree identification project

The trees in Cedars Park's arboretum have been identified and tagged by members of the Friends of Cedars Park.

This large-scale project, spanning 2019 to 2021, has enabled the community to better understand and enjoy trees within the arboretum.

Professional advice, books and websites, including state-of-the-art artificial intelligence technology developed by National Geographic, have been used to accurately identify over 600 trees.

An identification tag affixed to each tree allows visitors to easily look up the species.

A white disc with number C 196, nailed into a tree trunk
Tree tag

A list of trees is available for public reference.

Other resources are available via Trees.

Background

The project was started in response to several members of the public who expressed interest in knowing the species of trees in Cedars Park, as there was a lack of information available.

Timeline

July 2019

Project proposed to Friends of Cedars Park, and planning begins.

An arboretum area (see map) excluding heavy woodland is established to help manage and locate trees. This is split into zones, allowing the project to be completed in stages to provide data to the public as early as possible.

August 2019

Tree identification begins.

September 2019

First booklets available in café.

March 2020

Project paused due to COVID-19 pandemic.

June 2020

Tree identification resumes.

September 2021

Tree identification completed.

2022

Tree data moved online for free access.

These videos were periodically recorded to document different stages of the project.

Outcome

  • The public is better informed about trees in Cedars Park.

  • Tree work can be carried out more efficiently; external staff, who may not be familiar with the park, can easily locate a particular tree.

  • If people wish to study trees, they can easily find a particular species.

  • Memorial trees and benches are easier to locate, due to zones.

Feedback

The tree project is a valuable asset helping visitors to discover the trees in the park. Their species lists and measurements . . . have contributed to our national knowledge of trees in cultivation.

CPRE Hertfordshire

What a great way to get local residents infused and passionate about the trees in Cedars Park.

Kew Gardens

It was obviously a labour of love and the hard work is clear to see . . . Congratulations on your valued achievement.

Woodland Trust